Czech University Students Prostitution

A 20 years old university student offers... France was recently shocked by the book ‘Mes cheres etudes’ written by a French student, who started to prostitute because of her bad social situation. There is no similar book in the Czech Republic, there are no certain numbers, how many students do prostitution, but… we all know how the social situation in the countries of the former USSR looks like.

In the case you wouldn’t know, it’s not very good. An average students’ part-time jobs are labeled Z (Woman) or M (Man). Those labeled Z consist mostly of cleaning and working at cashier desk, usually paid 35-50 CZK (1,25 – 1,8 € per hour). Those labelled M are hard manual jobs, like truck unloading or supermarket stocking. Usually 40-60 CZK (1,4 – 2,1 € per hour). Do you think no one can survive with that money? You are right…

But that is in Prague. In other regions, some students don’t get any job at all. It is hard to study a university if one lives in a basement, eats spaghetti every day and travels to school by a bicycle, even in winter. Contrasted with more lucky classmates driving cars, wearing fancy clothes, having a life.

Yes, Czech University students prostitute. Especially those from subjects where there is no money – like teaching. Students of Pedagogical faculties prostituting. Get used to it.

Regarding this situation, the very idea of introducing school-fees at Czech Universities seems quite cruel… or is it? What is better; to have better quality education, in highly dignified institutions for upper classes and those willing to work all the time, even prostituting, or have average quality education in average surroundings for all?

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Comments

  1. Jiri Prasil said, Feb 6, 02:42 PM #

    I definitely didn’t like the author’s leftist comments at the end of the article. The more articles I read on this website the more I see this “hidden propaganda” of leftist ideas and thinking.
    “Some people live in the basements and ride bicycles to school, others go by cars. “ I’d say: hello, that’s the way it has always been. The dream of communism, that everybody is the same, clearly didn’t work so please give us a break. Those who are “lucky”, as you call them, worked hard to have their money, or their parents did anyway. I can see a typical Czech comment coming my way: most of the rich people got their wealth by cheating, stealing or evading tax. Open your eyes, work honestly, have ideas, be good businessmen and don’t be lazy, that’s the recipe for being successful. Not grumbling in front of the TV or in the bars and calling the “good ol’ days”. Some people just never stop envying …

  2. Me said, Feb 7, 10:33 AM #

    Well yeah, the article was supposed to provoke a little bit – 95% of abc articles are neutral, and we like it that way – but what is the point of writing articles if you don’t arouse some controversy, once a time. Listen. When I was studying a University in Spain, we talked about this topic with my classmates, and they all agreed that when the charges increased to about 3000 €/year in 2006, it became impossible for some students to study on. They used to have university studies paid from taxes, but then the government passed a law about paying for studies. The charges have been increased every two or three years, and keep increasing on. Is that really what we want here? I don’t want any communists to get back, but I just don’t want to live in a country that forces people out from studies, because it is not able to run its economics either. And if payments force girls or boys to prostitute in order to get a diploma in order to get a job, who is their pimp?